Over three quarters of people with a learning disability are missing out on vital support at GP surgeries

Mencap and NHS England launch Don’t Miss Out guides and video to improve healthcare provision for people with a learning disability

Learning disability charity Mencap, in partnership with NHS England, has launched a new animation and online guides called Don’t Miss Out to raise awareness of the importance for people with a learning disability to be on their GP’s learning disability register.

Just 23% of people with a learning disability are registered as having a learning disability with their GP and just 44% receive an Annual Health Check. This is despite well documented evidence of the health inequalities experienced by people with a learning disability, with 1,200 avoidable deaths every year.

If people with a learning disability tell their GP’s they have a learning disability they are entitled to extra help. This can include:

  • Extra timefor appointments
  • Easy Read informationthat is accessible
  • Annual Health Checksthat help to maintain health, detect conditions and illnesses and help GPs to understand how to provide better care to patients with a learning disability.

For more information visit www.mencap.org.uk/dontmissout  

Youssef Abidat has a learning disability. He said:

“My GP phones me to remind me about my health check, because sometimes I forget. I’m happy with my health centre. I didn’t realise I was low on vitamin B12 until I had my Annual Health Check, so now I take vitamins to correct that. If I didn’t have the check I may have been ill and not realised it.” 

Rachel Ashcroft, Strategic Development Manager for Health at learning disability charity Mencap, said:

“Visiting the GP can be incredibly difficult if you have a learning disability. Making appointments, understanding what the doctor is saying and explaining how you feel can be really hard. Being on the GP’s learning disability register can ensure healthcare is much more accessible and can result in better health outcomes for people with a learning disability.

“There are 1,200 avoidable deaths of people with a learning disability every year due to the health inequalities that people with a learning disability face. Access to better support, more time and annual health checks could play a crucial role in improving patient-doctor relationships and ensuring that people with a learning disability receive the healthcare and treatment they need.”

Dr Matt Hoghton, GP at Clevedon Medical Group and North Somerset CCG learning disability clinical lead, said:

“Doing the Annual Health Checks allows me to build a long-term, trusting relationship with patients who have a learning disability. This means I can do the necessary examinations, such as blood tests. At the same time, I learn more about the person and can make reasonable adjustments to their care.”

About Mencap

There are 1.4 million people with a learning disability in the UK. Mencap works to support people with a learning disability, their families and carers by fighting to change laws, improve services and access to education, employment and leisure facilities. Mencap supports thousands of people with a learning disability to live their lives the way they want.

www.mencap.org.uk

For advice and information about learning disability and Mencap services in your area, contact Mencap Direct on 0808 808 1111 (9am-5pm, Monday-Friday) or email help@mencap.org.uk

1 Comment on "Over three quarters of people with a learning disability are missing out on vital support at GP surgeries"

  1. Kathleen Kiff | 18 June, 2017 at 8:31 am | Reply

    Yes i agree my son 58 years old needs more time when he sees his GP now after i made a complaint to NHS England about his appalling treatment which NHS England upheld they give him a double appointment,they still fail in some respects,i am his mother i put his repeat prescription in i said to him 4 days later go and collect your prescription 3 receptionists were there he said they couldn’t find his prescription they put their hands up and said to him it’s lost it’s lost he says nothing and walks out no sit in the waiting room whilst we speak to the prescription clerk or come back tomorrow, again i had to phone and complain they soon found it,he lives independently i am his carer i worry what will happen when i am no longer here to fight for him

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