London clinic successfully uses 3D printing to make orthoses for children

A London clinic for disabled children has begun using 3D technology to treat their patients. 

Established in 2014, Andiamo was launched by Samiya and her husband, Naveed to help support disabled children. Now, the company has announced the launch of The Andiamo Clinic based near Old Street in East London.

The clinic has been providing orthoses for children through 3D scanning and printing.

HISTORY

In 2002, the couple’s son, Diamo was born with cerebral palsy, meaning he had monthly appointments for orthoses to help manage his posture and pain. 

The casts were often poorly fitting, or didn’t fit at all, and the family were constantly having to return to the orthosists to have adjustments made. Samiya made the decision to stop working and care for Diamo full-time, until he sadly passed away in 2012. 

It was her experience with the orthoses that instilled Samiya’s desire to help other children in a similar position to her son, and ensure other families never have to experience the health inadequacies they did – which is where technology comes in. 

The clinic, launched in their son’s name, uses pioneering and innovative design, to make medical wearables, beginning with orthoses. 

LEARN

Samiya and Naveed hope that the work the clinic is doing will make families’ and children’s lives better. 

Feedback on the orthoses has been overwhelmingly positive, with many saying they are lighter weight, they sweat less wearing them and fit perfectly.

For many of the children who wear them, the orthoses aid their independence and confidence.

Andiamo is working with Queen Mary Hospital and St Bartholomew’s Hospital, to further research, enhance their techniques and enable them to move into other areas of orthosis. 

For more information about the Andiamo Clinic, visit their website here.

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