Getting healthy inside and out during Children’s Mental Health Week

This week (4 – 10 February) is Children’s Mental Health Week and the theme is caring for ourselves, inside and out.

We all know to go to the doctor when we’re not feeling physically well, but sometimes, when we experience mental ill health, it can be hard to reach out.

INSIDE AND OUT

Discussions on mental health have shone a light on mental illness in recent years, ultimately, starting to break down the taboo and stigma.

During this year’s Children’s Mental Health Week the theme is to encourage people to be Healthy: Inside and Out.

Children’s mental health charity, Place2Be provides school-based support and training programmes to encourage and educate children, young people, and adults about the importance of their mental health.

As a parent or carer, we all want the best for our loved ones. So, ensuring they’re happy and mentally healthy is important.

CARE

During this week, there are several things you can do to support your child to understand what mental health is and how to care for mental illness.

So, ensuring they’re happy and mentally healthy is important. During this week, there are several things you can do to support your child to understand what mental health is and how to care for mental illness.

  • Chat with a child about ways you personally look after your own mental health.
  • Celebrate the self-care methods a child, or family member, does to care for their mental health.
  • Remind them that there is no such thing as a perfect body or mind! We are all unique, and mental ill health is not something to be ashamed off.

More young people are experiencing mental illness due to the pressures of growing up. Figures released from Place2Be in conjunction with Children’s Mental Health Week reveal that sleep is a major factor in good or poor mental health.

Getting less than the recommended nine hours of sleep on a school night are more likely to experiences worries at school and coping with school work.

“At least three children in every class have a diagnosable mental health issue, and many more worry about everyday concerns from exams to family life,” said Catherine Roche, chief executive of Place2Be.

Place2Be is supporting teachers and parents with advice on how sensible sleep habits, eating well and exercise help children cope with daily worries. However, further research is needed to explore if children are lacking sleep because they worry, or worry because they aren’t getting enough sleep.”

Learn more about Children’s Mental Health Week and how you can support children and young people by visiting the Place2Be website.

What are you doing to support childhood mental health? Let us know on Twitter and Instagram.